Us says beginning defensive measures to protect its citizens from the looming nuclear threat is what has prompted it to step up its work with countries that are currently testing high-level nuclear materials

Us says beginning defensive measures to protect its citizens from the looming nuclear threat is what has prompted it to step up its work with countries that are currently testing high-level nuclear materials.

Last month, North Korea launched a large submarine to test a nuclear weapon. Pyongyang has repeatedly threatened military action against the U.S. since the regime’s 2011 launch of a rocket carrying a nuclear warhead.

“One of the things that will help deter the threat from North Korea is to use technology that is highly enriched uranium. We are ????working very closely with others on this. We believe if they are smart, they will want to have the right technology for us, and we will want to have the right technology for them,” Prakash told the Washington Free Beacon. “We know there are other countries out there that are willing to do just that. We will ensure that those nations use it as we do.”

He continued:

“They have to get off that. They have to get off that that they’re going to be in it. So you have to find ways of not only deterring them but having deterrents at those places that are more easily accessible. We are focused on the North Korean nuclear program but we need to work with many of the countries who are not doing anything, but are in the field like Japan, South Korea, and China. I can’t give you specific numbers, but those are nations that we can find allies. And then we’re going to find ways of making those countries deterring others from going after tgta5???hem with their own nuclear weapons.”

The Nuclear Threat Initiative, which Prakash founded and runs through the Office of the National Intelligence Director, is an influential group of U.S. intelligence officials and intelligence experts and serves as a conduit to various nuclear weapons states.

It’s believed that several countries around the world are testing high-level nuclear materials, from uranium enriched to at least 100 percent for weapons use and from plutonium which is already used in nuclear weapons.

Prakash said the group works with multiple intelligence agencies to track all of the country’s nuclear weapons work, from res????? ????earch to testing, and provide guidance on the most effective countermeasures.

Loud music warning falls on deaf ears (The Star/ The Globe and Mail)

Loud music warning falls on deaf ears (The Star/ The Globe and Mail)

And the loud sounds were more often associated with those with “poor hearing”.

For example, when respondents with a severe hearing impairment were compared with those without, the researchers found that the loudness of so???????unds in their own homes was higher in areas with an “acutely or very poorly” severe hearing impairment (such as for example, if the sound was heard repeatedly over time).

These findings suggest the frequency of sound in homes is influenced, in part, by the severity of a hearing impairment, according to the study’s author, Dr. Christine MacNaughton, a professor of optometry at McMaster University. The researchers are interested in finding out whether this influences how people with hearing impairment, people who speak too much, use music, watch TV, and how they interact with other people.

While the exact mechanism of how loud sounds play a role in our hearing is still under investigation, MacNaughton points out that it’s probably not due to simp?? ? ???le noise-cancelling mechanisms that the researchers tested. Rather, it might be down????? to human speech.

While we’re being taught that loud music makes us feel better, this study suggests that this “sense of better listening” in music may not actually be true.